Anthropology

Anthropology

The faculty and students of the Anthropology Department of the Community College of Aurora study and interpret the role of biology and culture in shaping human diversity in the past and the present to develop a global perspective on the human species.

CSI: Aurora Project

Contact Information:
Elizabeth Hirsh
Coordinator of Anthropology Department
Elizabeth.Hirsh@ccaurora.edu
303-360-4723

Anthropology Courses

ANT 101 - Cultural Anthropology (GT-SS3)

A cultural event occurring in another country

3 Credit hours - 45 Contact hours

Studies human cultural patterns and learned behavior. Includes linguistics, social and political organization, religion, culture and personality, culture change, and applied anthropology. 

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCR 092, CCR 093 or CCR 094 (grade C or higher) or equivalent assessment scores.

 

 

ANT 107 - Introduction to Archaeology (GT-SS3)

A skeleton embedded in the ground3 Credit hours - 45 Contact hours

Introduces the science of recovering the human prehistoric and historic past through excavation, analysis, and interpretation of material remains. Includes a survey of the archaeology of different areas of the Old and New Worlds. Also includes the works of selected archaeologists and discussions of major archaeological theories.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCR 092, CCR 093 or CCR 094 (grade C or higher) or equivalent assessment scores.

*During Fall semesters, this course involves a weekend field trip to Southeastern Utah for archaeological site visits.

 

ANT 111 - Biological Anthropology w/Lab (GT-SC1)

Monkeys outside

4 Credit hours - 90 Contact hours

Focuses on the study of the human species and related organisms, and examines principles of genetics, evolution, anatomy, classification, and ecology, including a survey of human variation and adaptation, living primate biology and behavior, and primate and human fossil evolutionary history.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCR 092, CCR 093 or CCR 094 (grade C or higher) or equivalent assessment scores. 

 

 

ANT 201 - Introduction to Forensic Anthropology (GT-SS3)

Skull

3 Credit hours - 45 Contact hours

Studies the basic principles of forensic anthropology, an applied field within the discipline of physical anthropology. Includes the study of the human skeleton, practical application of physical anthropology and archaeology, and judicial procedure, as they relate to the identification of human remains within a medico-legal context.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCR 092, CCR 093 or CCR 094 (grade C or higher) or equivalent assessment scores.

 

 

 

 

 

ANT 215 - Indians of North America (GT-SS3)

North American Indians sitting down3 Credit hours - 45 Contact hours

Studies the Indians of North America from the origins of native peoples in the New World, through the development of geographic culture areas, to European contact and subsequent contemporary Native American issues.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCR 092, CCR 093 or CCR 094 (grade C or higher) or equivalent assessment scores.

 

 

ANT 250 - Medical Anthropology (GT-SS3)

A person places needles in someone's back as part of an acupuncture procedure3 Credit hours - 40-45 Contact hours

Studies the basic principles of medical anthropology, an applied field within the discipline of cultural anthropology. Includes the cross-cultural study of practices and beliefs regarding illness, health, death, prevention and therapy; and the interaction of the medical systems between Western and other cultures.

Prerequisite: Successful completion of CCR 092, CCR 093 or CCR 094 (grade C or higher) or equivalent assessment scores. 

 

 

Program Level Outcomes (PLOs)

Statements which articulate, in measurable terms, what students should know and be able to demonstrate as a result of and at the conclusion of a program. PLOs communicate program goals explicitly and foster transfer of responsibility for learning from faculty to students.

A student who obtains an AA degree in Anthropology from the Community College of Aurora will demonstrate the following abilities:

  • Understand the basic tenets of and distinctions between the five subfields in the discipline: Cultural Anthropology, Linguistic Anthropology, Archaeology, Biological Anthropology, and Applied Anthropology.
  • Understand the themes and concepts the cut across traditional subfield boundaries, including, but not limited to: a. The ability to apply and analyze anthropological perspectives, approaches, and knowledge in ways that enhance understanding of cultural diversity and biological diversity of the human species; b. The ability to analyze the impact of cultural change and globalization; c. The ability to understand and appreciate the role of evolution in the human species; d. The ability to be open-minded, use cultural relativism, and be adaptable in novel or unfamiliar social situations.
  • Students are expected to use anthropological research methodology, including scientific methodology, to collect data, and draw on both qualitative and quantitative methods of analyzing anthropological data and to present that material in at least one high-quality piece of writing.
  • Develop a working knowledge of the role of anthropological theory and its use in understanding real-world relationships. 
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